Is your garage door's outside keypad not working? Why is this so?

One of the conveniences that many families rely on is the outside keypad for their garage door opener. You can gain access to your garage or home by remembering a simple code rather than carrying a physical key. The keypad has become a necessity for busy families, particularly when children are dropped off by the school bus in the afternoon and enter through the garage. When this simple entry device fails, the record scratches and everything stops. Let’s look at why your outside keypad might be malfunctioning.

Dimming the Backlight

Just because your keypad lights up doesn’t mean the battery is fine. The backlight on many keypads may be dim, indicating that the battery has power but not enough to transmit a complete signal to the garage door opener circuit board. Replacing the battery will resolve these issues, and the backlight should be much brighter the next time you walk up to enter your code.

Pro Tip: Even if the backlight on your outside keypad has gone out, it still works normally. This would happen, but you can continue to use the keypad without the need for a backlight for as long as it works for you. If you miss having the backlight, you’ll need to order a new keypad or have your garage door company replace it.

The Vacation Lock on the Wall Button has been activated

Some garage door opener models feature deluxe wall buttons (also known as wall consoles) rather than the older doorbell style wall button. These deluxe wall buttons include at least two additional buttons for activating the vacation lock and the built-in light. One of the most common issues is that the vacation lock has been activated.

If the vacation lock on your wall button is activated, the light will blink or turn off, depending on the brand of garage door opener you have. Vacation locks are intended to disable remotes and keypads, preventing unauthorised access to the home from the outside. Some garage door opener brands will only lock out the remotes, while others will lock out the remotes as well as the outside keypads.

The battery must be replaced

The first thing you should check if your outside keypad isn’t working is the battery. The backlight is the easiest way to tell if your battery needs to be replaced. The backlight illuminates the keys, allowing you to see them at night. If your backlight does not turn on, your battery is most likely dead and needs to be replaced.

Most wireless keypads have a battery installed at the bottom. To access the battery compartment, there is usually a removable cover. To access the battery on some universal keypads, a small Phillips screwdriver is required to remove a cover. The 9V battery is the most commonly used in outside keypads, but most Genie keypads will use the A23 barrel battery.

Yes, your outside keypad has a battery, which many homeowners are unaware of. The outside keypad is essentially a keypad for a garage door remote. To activate the open and close cycles, it communicates wirelessly with the circuit board in your opener Motörhead (a box hanging from the ceiling of your garage). Simple.

Slowly enter your keypad code

On numerous occasions, the keypad code is entered too quickly, denying the circuit board the opportunity to process the signal. Slow it down while entering your code and pressing the enter button. This simple fix will often resolve issues with your outside keypad not activating the motor.

Longer Pressing the Enter Button

After you enter your code, the last button pressed on your outside keypad is enter. This button may also be referred to as the “start/stop” button, the “send” button, or it may simply have up/down arrows printed on it. In any case, try holding this button down longer after entering your code until the motor turns on.

Use a “Universal Keypad”

If you have a universal keypad from Chamberlain, LiftMaster, or Clicker, you may not be using it correctly. After entering your four-digit code, you press the “enter” or “open/close” button on this universal keypad. The “0” key is designed to be the enter button on the keypad, so it is the last button you press after entering your code. To open and close your garage door with one of these keypads, add a “0” to the end of your keypad code.

You may be entering insufficient digits

When you first set up your PIN, some outside keypads allow you to enter four or six digits. If you do not enter the correct code, your keypad will not activate your automatic opener. This may seem absurd to list as one of the reasons why a keypad is not working, but it is a common blunder. If you have lost your keypad code, you must programme a new one.

The keypad must be reprogrammed

Outside keypads and remotes frequently lose their programming. Circuit boards, like brains, can experience intermittent problems caused by power outages or fluctuations. On numerous occasions, simply reprogramming remotes and keypads has solved the problem. Determine the model of your automatic opener, remote, or keypad before conducting a quick online search. There are numerous online videos that will walk you through the reprogramming process, or you can download the manual from the manufacturer’s website.

Vintage Black Genie Keypad with Slide Cover

One of Genie’s more unique designs was the older GWK-IC outside keypad with the black slide up cover. The keypad was designed to only function when the keypad cover was fully opened, which activated a button behind the slide up cover. If you push the cover too far, it will slide past the button. A trick was to slide the cover up to the point where it needed to stop, then install a small nail right above the sliding cover, so it would stop at that exact point every time you used it. This will eliminate any issues with the cover sliding too far upward when opening or closing your garage door.

The Antenna Wire on the Circuit Board is missing

A wire will usually hang down from the motor head of most automatic garage door openers. This wire is soldered to the circuit board’s receiver and allows remotes and outside keypads to communicate with the main circuit board. We’ve seen instances where this wire was completely missing or tucked up into the housing. If the wire on your garage door opener is missing, look around the motor head to figure out why.

Remotes and keypads will most likely still work, but you’ll need to be much closer if the antenna wire is missing. If the wire has been severed, the only solution is to replace it. The wire could have been severed by an inexperienced person or damaged by previous tenants. We’ve even heard of people cutting the wire because they were worried about someone scanning remote frequencies while driving down the street. If you work in the field long enough, you will hear a variety of stories.

The Receiver on the Circuit Board has failed

The antenna wire mentioned earlier is connected to the receiver portion of the circuit board inside the motor head. We’ve seen the circuit board receiver fail numerous times, preventing the remotes and keypads from activating the unit while the inside wired wall button works perfectly. Some homeowners prefer to continue using their automatic opener only through the inside wall button, while others prefer to have the wireless issues resolved.

The simplest and most obvious solution is to replace the circuit board. The model number of the circuit board will be located here on circuit board cover, and this part is simple to find online. A second option is to install an external receiver to which remotes and keypads can be programmed, which will be wired directly to the circuit board’s wall button terminals. The Linear MDR/U (318mhz) and the LiftMaster 365LM (315mhz) are two of the most common external receivers for residential use. Both receivers are powered by an outlet in the garage and have terminals for connecting to the opener motor head’s wiring. Both of these receivers will programme to Linear and LiftMaster remotes via the learn button on the external receiver, and instructions are usually included.

Additional Tip: 

Many Chamberlain and LiftMaster outside keypads have an excellent convenience feature that many people are unaware of. It’s called “One Touch to Close,” and it’s easy to understand.

If your garage door is in the open position, all you should have to do to close it is press the “Enter” button. The PIN is only needed to open the garage door and gain entry into the house. This is a great feature for leaving the house or going for walks if you frequently exit through the garage. Not having to enter the PIN every time you close the garage door will save you a significant amount of time over the course of a year.

Final Words

If you are having problems with your garage door’s outside keypad, always check to see if you have a good battery. Even if you recently replaced the battery in your keypad, replace it again. We’ve seen brand-new batteries fail prematurely on numerous occasions, which surprises many homeowners.

If trying a couple of new batteries doesn’t solve your problem, proceed down the list in this article. We’ve gone over some of the most common ways to troubleshoot keypad problems with your automatic garage door opener. One of the suggestions in this article may save you from having to pay a service call for a simple fix you can do yourself. And just in case it doesn’t work it means you need professional to resolve the issue and our expert team at Premium garage door is always there to help just on a call away.

You may be entering insufficient digits

When you first set up your PIN, some outside keypads allow you to enter four or six digits. If you do not enter the correct code, your keypad will not activate your automatic opener. This may seem absurd to list as one of the reasons why a keypad is not working, but it is a common blunder. If you have lost your keypad code, you must programme a new one.

The keypad must be reprogrammed

Outside keypads and remotes frequently lose their programming. Circuit boards, like brains, can experience intermittent problems caused by power outages or fluctuations. On numerous occasions, simply reprogramming remotes and keypads has solved the problem. Determine the model of your automatic opener, remote, or keypad before conducting a quick online search. There are numerous online videos that will walk you through the reprogramming process, or you can download the manual from the manufacturer’s website.

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